Tag Archives: traffic calming

History of Quesada Ave. speed humps

By Jeffrey Betcher

A neighbor asked me about how a recently installed speed hump on our Bayview block came to be. Like most resident-led civic improvements, it didn’t happen quickly.  And it didn’t happen because one person, on either the community side or the City side of the equation, tried to make it happen.

Truth is, NASCAR-like traffic on this single residential block has been an issue for residents even before the first record we have of asking the City for speed bumps (or speed humps, as we evolved). I’m going to age another year just by typing this, but that first request was in 2003!

>We caught a break when community-sensitive Nick Carr at SFMTA contacted me about a traffic calming planning process for an area of Bayview that included the Quesada Gardens’ block.  I inserted our request into that traffic calming plan, noting the history of our community’s request, a history that involved lots of others beside myself.

That speed hump slowed traffic for about a third of the block, but checkered flags were still waving on the rest of the block.  At the same time, work to improve life on the block had succeeded enough that there were many more pedestrians walking the sidewalks and crossing the street to enjoy the gardens and art projects. The risk of an accident was still high.

I kept in touch with Nick about it all, and he responded again!  Hydra, Wei Ming, Shane and others did a lot of footwork to get neighbors to vote for the second hump. Hydra contacted Nick to help keep things moving.

Here’s a bit of speed hump history …

2003: The first request for speed bumps is noted in Quesada Gardens’ first set of meeting notes.

2004: Sharon advocates for traffic calming through DPT. We organized a community meeting, and presented a petition to City reps asking for action.

2006: A Quesada Gardens meeting is devoted to the issue of traffic calming after Denise King‘s new car was totaled in a head on collision at the upper end of Quesada, but resulted in our being turned down for speed humps in favor of speed limit signs and the elimination a parking spot that made turns at the top of the hill dangerous.

Work to slow traffic continues on Quesada. More

 

Innovative traffic-calming at Quesada Gardens

Images by Shane King

John and friend

Shane King lives on the upper side of Quesada Avenue, which has a speed limit of 15 MPH, and he’s tired of seeing and hearing cars whiz by his house.

A speed bump was installed, to little avail. So King, Co-Chair of Quesada Gardens Initiative, brought up the idea of traffic calming cutouts shaped like local children and pets. He thought that putting up cutouts of the people and pets who actually live on the block might make speeders think about who lives here. Maybe they will slow down.

“I thought of this solution for three reasons,” King said “It’s a reminder that speed limit is 15 MPH on the street, it’s a way to show speeders who’s lives they are risking, and it is a way to show all the kids on the street they are honored members of our community.”

kids cutoutsThere are nine kids under ten on the 1700 block of Quesada. The cutouts should be finished and placed by mid-August. They will be placed in the garden in view of drivers.

If you have an idea for our community and would like to get involved, Quesada Gardens Initiative welcomes you to join us at our community building meetings the first Thursday of each month at 6pm. All community members are welcome.

cutouts